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Recent photographic records of Fishing Cat Prionailurus viverrinus in the Ayeyarwady Delta of Myanmar
The distribution of the Fishing Cat Prionailurus viverrinus (Carnivora: Felidae) in Myanmar remains poorly known owing to a paucity of verifiable field records. We here present two recent photographic records that confirm the occurrence of the Fishing Cat in the Ayeyarwady Delta of southern Myanmar. Our photographic records together with other reports and the availability of suitable wetland habitat suggest that the Ayeyarwady Delta is globally important for Fishing Cat conservation. Deforestation, driven largely by agriculture, however, is of concern for the future survival of the Fishing Cat in Myanmar. Additional surveys are warranted to further resolve the distribution of the Fishing Cat in Myanmar.
Geochelone platynota - giantism (2019)
Global conservation status of Turtles
Falcaustra tintliwni (Bursey & Platt 2018)
Rattans of Myanmar (Myanmar Version)
Rattans of Myanmar is the result of a 14-year collaborative effort between the New York Botanical Garden, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) Myanmar Program, and the Forest Department of the Myanmar Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation (MONREC) to promote the conservation and sustainable use of one of the most valuable and widely used non-timber forest products in the world. This volume is a valuable contribution to palm systematics, community forestry, sustainable resource use, and to all of the stakeholders involved with rattan in Myanmar. This book will help you identify rattans and will give you a greater understanding of how rattans grow and maintain themselves in the forest. It is our hope that the Rattans of Myanmar will provide an incentive for further botanical exploration, collection, and documentation of local rattans, and will eventually form the foundation of more sustainable systems for exploiting wild rattan populations. We thank you for your interest in the rattans of Myanmar and hope you find this book useful.
Rattans of Myanmar (English Version)
Rattans of Myanmar is the result of a 14-year collaborative effort between the New York Botanical Garden, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) Myanmar Program, and the Forest Department of the Myanmar Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation (MONREC) to promote the conservation and sustainable use of one of the most valuable and widely used non-timber forest products in the world. This volume is a valuable contribution to palm systematics, community forestry, sustainable resource use, and to all of the stakeholders involved with rattan in Myanmar. This book will help you identify rattans and will give you a greater understanding of how rattans grow and maintain themselves in the forest. It is our hope that the Rattans of Myanmar will provide an incentive for further botanical exploration, collection, and documentation of local rattans, and will eventually form the foundation of more sustainable systems for exploiting wild rattan populations. We thank you for your interest in the rattans of Myanmar and hope you find this book useful.
Characterization of fisheries and marine wildlife occurrence in southern Rakhine State and western Ayeyarwady Region, Myanmar
Myanmar’s marine resources are important for the country’s national development as well as for local livelihoods. During July 2017 – July 2018, WCS in collaboration with Pathein University’s Marine Science Department, the Rakhine Coastal Resource Conservation Association (RCA), and other partners, conducted a marine fisheries activity and socio-economic assessment in order to develop a deeper understanding of the fishing communities and marine wildlife occurrence along Myanmar’s western coastline – the Mawtin Coast - in southern Rakhine State and western Ayeyarwady Region. The scope of the assessment covered both inshore and offshore fisheries, as well as key marine wildlife species including: cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), sea turtles, Dugong, elasmobranchs (sawfish, sharks, and rays), and salt water crocodiles. In short, we conducted participatory mapping of coastal fishing grounds and gear use across 13 communities and interviewed 481 inshore fisher households and 36 offshore fishers to better understand socioeconomic conditions. Our results revealed a total of 18 different major gear types currently utilized by inshore fishers. Mapping of coastal fishing grounds, gears used, and fishing practices provides a better understanding of local resource use and dependence, and its relevance to coastal livelihoods. A number of specific recommendations are provided for future efforts to advance sustainable fisheries and co-management, as well as informing marine spatial planning, biodiversity conservation, and marine protected area development. This report will therefore prove valuable for a wide variety of stakeholders to support sustainable fisheries and marine biodiversity conservation in the Mawtin Coast region and more broadly across Myanmar.
Annex 1 & 2
Burmese flapshell turtle behavior and Rathke's glands (Hamadryad 2018)
Birds of western Myanmar (Forktail - 2017)
A Conservation Assessment of the Critically Endangered Burmese Star Tortoise in Chatthin Wildlife Sanctuary, Myanmar
Howard, R. 2018. Marine Biodiversity of Myeik Archipelago Survey Results 2013-2017 and Conservation Recommendations
Leatherback nesting in Myanmar (2018)
Co-operative fishing with Irrewady Dolphin_WCS Myanmar
TSA Magazine 2017 - Myanmar

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